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MACD
The Moving Average Convergence/Divergence (MACD) indicator shows the relationship between 2 moving averages of prices. MACD is derived by dividing one moving average by another. It is based on the point spread difference between 2 exponential moving averages of the closing price.

The basic MACD trading rule is to sell when the MACD falls below its signal line and to buy when the MACD rises above its signal line.

The MACD is most effective in wide-swinging trading markets. When the MACD rises dramatically, it is likely that the security's price is overextending and will soon return to more realistic levels.

A bearish divergence occurs when the MACD is making new lows while prices fail to reach new lows. A bullish divergence occurs when the MACD is making new highs while prices fail to reach new highs. These divergences are most significant when they occur at relatively overbought/oversold levels.

The MACD indicator in BigCharts references the following default parameters:

MA Envelopes
A Moving Average (MA) shows the average value of a security's price over a period of time. The value is calculated by totaling all the previous closing prices over a time period and dividing them by the number of bars in that time period.

Depending upon the number of bars you use to calculate this figure, these lines may be very sharp (7- or 12-day moving average), or very smooth (40-day moving average).

The Moving Average Envelopes indicator from BigCharts references the following fixed parameters:

Mailing Address
This refers to the address where you want communications from Fidelity to be sent (e.g., statements, trade confirmations). You should also have a legal address on file with Fidelity.

While you may change a mailing address from time to time (e.g., as a result of a seasonal move to a winter or summer residence), a legal address is the address you use for official purposes such as tax reporting.

If you request an IRA distribution and do not have a legal address on file with Fidelity, your mailing address is used to determine your state of legal residence and the state tax laws that determine if Fidelity must withhold state tax from your distribution and, if so, how much.

Make whole call
A corporate issue with an implicit call at an increasing premium as interest rates decline. Issuers may call these bonds at par plus a premium. This premium is derived from the yield of a comparable Treasury security plus additional basis points. The "street" treats these issues as non-call bonds due to the fact that it would be prohibitively expensive for a company to exercise this call option.

Management Fee
Money paid by a mutual fund to its investment manager or advisor for overseeing the portfolio. A management fee is usually between one-half and one percent of the fund's net asset value.

Margin
Ability to borrow against securities you own to purchase other securities, cover checks written against the account, etc., up to a specified limit.

Marginable Security
A security that can be bought by borrowing on margin.

The Federal Reserve determines which securities are marginable. Marginable securities you hold in your account are held in margin which increases your margin buying power.

On the fixed-income security (e.g., bond) details screen, Yes displays if the security is marginable. No displays if it is not.

Margin Agreement
An Agreement between you and Fidelity that specifies the rules and limits for borrowing on margin against your brokerage account.

Note:The margin trading account feature is not available for retirement and Fidelity NetBenefits® accounts.

Margin Buying Power
The maximum dollar amount available, including both cash and margin, to purchase marginable securities without adding money to your account. The balance includes open order commitments, intraday trade executions, and money movement into and out of the account.

Margin Call
Margin calls occur whenever margin equity in the account falls below various requirements or minimums. There are three types of requirements, each with its corresponding calls; Federal, Exchange and House. A Federal Call occurs when there is insufficient equity to satisfy the 50% initial requirement on an opening transaction. An Exchange (or NYSE) Call occurs when the account margin equity falls NYSE’s requirement which is generally 25%. A House Call occurs in a Fidelity account when margin equity falls below Fidelity’s house requirement which is generally set at 35% but can be higher for certain securities.

Margin Calls Due Today
This is the total amount you owe for margin calls that must be settled before the end of the current day and any prior calls that may be past due. This amount does not include any day trade call amounts that may also be due.

Margin Calls Issued
This is the total dollar amount for all margin calls that have been officially issued against your account by the Federal Reserve Board, Exchange, or house (Fidelity).Fidelity reserves the right to meet margin calls at any time prior to the stated due date.

You generally have five business days from the date a house or Federal call is issued to deposit additional cash or securities to meet the call amount. You generally have 48 hours to do so for an exchange call. However, calls can be called at any time depending on market activity.

Margin Credit
The amount due to you based on margin trade executions. This amount will be credited to your Core Money Market on the settlement date. If you owe Fidelity money rather than having money due to you, the amount is instead reflected as a margin debit.

Margin Debit
The amount you must pay Fidelity for margin trade executions. This amount will be debited from your Core Money Market on the settlement date (if, at that time, there is not enough cash in the Core Money Market, interest will start to accrue on the amount owed). If rather than owing Fidelity money, there is money due to you, the amount is instead reflected as a margin credit.

Margin Debit Interest
This is the most recent margin interest rate that is applicable to you account. This rate is calculated by combining Fidelity's base rate with a rate related to the size of your account's Margin Debit Balance.

Margin Equity
The value of all securities held in margin, minus the amount of in-the-money covered options and margin debt (if any) in the account.

Margin Equity Percentage
The margin equity, as a percentage of the margin market value of the account. For example, if the margin market value is $150,000 and you borrow $25,000 on margin (giving you a margin equity balance of $125,000), the margin equity percent is 83.3% (125,000 divided by 150,000).

Margin Interest Rate
This is the most recent margin interest rate that is applicable to your account. This rate is calculated by combining Fidelity's base rate with a rate related to the size of your account's margin debit balance.

Margin Market Value
The value of all securities held in margin, minus the amount of in-the-money covered options.

Margin Requirement
The minimum equity required in your account to purchase a security or for securities you hold in margin in your account. If you are approved for margin trading, you can view the margin requirement for securities you own by viewing account positions or by using the Margin Requirements feature to see requirements for other securities.

Margin requirements are updated as of the end of the previous business day. Margin requirements are specific to the chosen account. Requirements may be different for the same security held in other accounts.

Market Capitalization ($ millions)
In a Company Profile, the last closing share price times the latest number of shares outstanding.

A stock's market capitalization can be categorized as small cap, mid cap, and large cap.

Market Decline Scenario
On the Historical Analysis screen, this is a list of market returns during different down-market periods based on the asset-allocation mix shown at the top of the screen.

The ending values associate your portfolio's net worth to the performance returns of the market for the market decline periods shown.

The down markets shown include the period from 1929-1932, 1972-1974, and other periods of market decline where at least a 20% decrease occurred as measured by the daily change in the Standard & Poor's 500 index.

The analysis uses your portfolios' or one or more selected accounts' asset-allocation mix to calculate the percentages. Then, the history performance information is calculated for the percentages using securities that are tracked in general market indexes.

Market Discount Income
Fixed income securities acquired at a market discount are generally purchased on the secondary market at less than the stated redemption price, or in the case of OID securities purchased on the secondary market, at less than the adjusted issue price. Market discount is generally the amount of the stated redemption price (or the OID-adjusted issue price) that is more than basis in the bond immediately after you acquire it on the secondary market. Under federal tax rules, market discount that is less than 0.25% of the stated redemption price (or OID-adjusted issue price) of the bond multiplied by the number of full years to maturity remaining at acquisition is treated as zero.

There are various rules and elections available for the treatment of market discount on your return, each of which may result in a different tax result. These rules only apply to fixed income securities issued with more than one year to maturity. Fidelity’s calculation of realized market discount income assumes you elected to defer recognizing the market discount until the sale (or other disposition) of the security, and assumes you elected to use the straight-line method from acquisition date through disposition date. Under this election, no market discount is recognized if the bond is sold at a loss. Other elections available under tax laws may be more beneficial, depending on your individual tax situation. For Federal tax purposes, market discount income from both taxable and tax-exempt bonds is treated as taxable interest income.

Acquiring securities issued with one year or less to maturity at a discount may result in an acquisition discount. Different rules apply to the treatment of a gain or loss for these securities.

Consult your tax advisor and IRS Publication 550, Investment Income and Expenses for additional information.

Market Fluctuation
The rise or fall in a security's price or portfolio's value within a short-term period; may be slight or dramatic depending on market and other conditions.

Market Gain/Loss
Market Gain/Loss refers to the amount of gain/loss caused by the change in price, in local currency, of the security. Currency fluctuation refers to the amount of gain/loss caused by the fluctuation in the exchange rate.

For a closed position in a security, the formulas that we used to calculate these two amounts are:

Market Gain/Loss = (Exchange Rate on the trade date of purchase x Proceeds in local currency) – US Dollar Basis

Currency Fluctuation = Total Gain/Loss in US Dollars - Market Gain/Loss

For an open position in a security, the formulas that we used to calculate these two amounts are:

Market Gain/Loss = (Exchange Rate on the trade date of purchase x Last Price in local currency) – US Dollar Basis

Currency Fluctuation = Total Unrealized Gain/Loss in US Dollars [or Change Since Purchase in US Dollars] - Market Gain/Loss

Market Maker
A dealer willing to accept the risk of holding securities to facilitate trading in a particular security or securities. Also called Principal.

Typically between three and 30 dealers compete with one another to make a market in a particular stock. A minimum of two market makers is required for each stock.

Market Order
An order price type placed on the execution of an order. A market order uses the best price in the current market to buy or sell a security at the time your order executes.

Market Risk
The risk that the price of a security will rise or fall due to changing economic, political, or market conditions, or due to a company's individual situation.

Market Session
The hours during which U.S. markets and exchanges are open for trading unless trading is halted. Fidelity offers three market sessions:

Market Value
The value of a security or a portfolio of securities based on the current market price. An indication of the value of all securities in a bond ladder, based on the third party evaluated price from the prior business day.

Market Value at Exercise
The price per share for the underlying stock at the time your stock option exercise order was executed. The price per share is based on the fair market value of your company's stock option plan.

Market Value at Purchase
The total fair market value of all price per share for the underlying stock at the time of a stock purchase made for an Employee Stock Purchase Plan on the day that the purchase was made.

Market Value of Securities

Matches
The number of securities that match your search criteria when you look up a symbol.

Material Events

Material Events reflect information that pertains to municipal bonds (For Corporate and Agency/GSE bonds see Issuer Events). They are designed to bring the investor's attention to key changes of the status of a particular issue or underlying issuer. These events include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) principal and interest payment delinquencies; (2) non-payment related defaults; (3) unscheduled draws on debt service reserves; (4) unscheduled draws on credit enhancements; (5) substitution of credit or liquidity providers; (6) adverse tax events affecting the tax-exempt status of the security; (7) modifications to rights of securities holders; (8) bond calls; (9) defeasances; (10) release, substitution, or sale of property securing repayment; (11) rating changes; (12) failure to provide annual financial information as required. The MSRB, Electronic Municipal Market Access (a.k.a. EMMA) provides free access to municipal disclosures, market data and education.

Fidelity makes these events available to its customers for informational purposes only. The information has been sourced from third parties and Fidelity has made no independent evaluation of the information or its accuracy, completeness, or timeliness.

On the Secondary Municipal Bond Search Results Table, "ME" displays in the Attributes column if there are Material Events for an issue and would not display if there were none. Available Material Events can be viewed. Select "ME" to access Material Events.

Material Events are also available as part of Fidelity's Event Alerts services. Holders of municipal bonds can elect to receive an event alert to be sent to them electronically whenever a Material Event is generated on one of their holdings.

Matrix Pricing Disclosure
Price and Yield are based on last evening's closing price. They are an indication of the price and yield based on the price at which the securities had traded on the previous day. However, it is not necessarily the value you would receive if you sold them at the current market price.

Maturity, Maturity Date(s)
The date on which the principal amount of a fixed-income security is scheduled to become due and payable, typically along with any final coupon payment.

It is also a list of the maturity dates on which individual bonds issued as part of a new issue municipal bond offering will mature.

For example, if the issuer is offering 25 bonds and the maturity dates for the individual bonds range over a 10-year period, one might see 8/4/2002, 2003-2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010. This would indicate that the securities mature on 8/4 of the years listed.

Maturity Value
This is similar to face value except that maturity value may include accrued interest. For example, Guaranteed Investment Certificates (GICs) accrue interest annually or semi-annually, but the coupon interest is not paid until maturity. As a result, the maturity value includes the face value as well as the compounded coupon interest.

Maximum
The highest value that can be specified when refining a particular search for fixed-income secondary market offerings. For example, the maximum coupon or ask price.

Maximum Amount Available
The maximum amount available for you to withdraw from your Employee Stock Purchase Plan.

Maximum Coupon Rate
For bond ladders, indicate the maximum coupon you would like to receive on any security in the ladder.

Maximum Price
For bond ladders, indicate the maximum price you would like to pay on any security in the ladder.

Maximum Rate
The maximum coupon rate that a stepped or variable rate security can adjust to. For bond ladders, it indicates the maximum coupon you would like to receive on any security in the ladder.

Median Yield
When sorting a list of bonds by their yields (highest to lowest, or lowest to highest), the median yield will be that yield that corresponds to the middle yield of the list. eg; In the scenario of five different bonds with the following yields: 2.0%, 1.8%, 1.5%, 1.2%, 1.0%, the median yield is 1.5% since there are two yields higher than 1.5% and two yields below 1.5%. If the list of yields is an even number there will be two median points. In applications such as the Yield Table on Fidelity.com where the user selects a “Median Yield” view, we will display the lower of the two numbers if there are an even number of bonds in the result set. When the viewer clicks on that yield value in the Yield Table to view the result set in the Search Results page, the Median Yield for both bonds and their yields will be highlighted if the results set contains an even number of bonds.

Medicare Tax Withheld
The total amount of Medicare tax withheld after an order to exercise non-qualified stock options executes. Your employer is required to report taxable income from the sale of stock options and remit the withholding amount to the appropriate regulatory agencies.

Merrill Lynch High Yield Master Index
The Merrill Lynch High Yield Master Index is a market capitalization weighted index of all domestic and Yankee high-yield bonds. Issues included in the index have maturities of at least one year and have a credit rating lower than BBB-Baa3, but are not in default.

Merrill Lynch High Yield Master II Index
The Merrill Lynch High-Yield Bond Master II Index is an unmanaged index that tracks the performance of below-investment-grade, U.S.-dollar-denominated corporate bonds publicly issued in the U.S. domestic market.

Method of Notification
For an indication of interest (IOI) in a new issue fixed-income offering (e.g., a bond offering), this is the electronic method, pager or e-mail, by which Fidelity will notify you of important information about the offering. For example, Fidelity will notify you when the offering is priced, of a change in the offering price, or the date and time period during which you must confirm your indication of interest.

Mid Cap
A class of assets where the holdings are in mid cap stocks, that is stocks with a level of capitalization between $500 million and $5 billion in market value. See also, Asset Class, International, Fixed Income, Small Cap, and Large Cap.

For portfolio and account analysis, individual stocks with a market capitalization between $1 billion and $5 billion in market value are classified as mid cap. Mutual funds with a median market capitalization between $1 billion and $5 billion, as defined by Morningstar, are classified as mid cap.

Mid-Cap Stocks
An investment categorization based on the market capitalization of a company.

Minimum
The lowest value that can be specified when refining a particular search for fixed-income secondary market offerings. For example, the minimum coupon or ask price.

Minimum Coupon Rate
For bond ladders, you can indicate the minimum coupon you would like to receive on any security in the ladder.

Minimum Increment
The lowest number of securities, the quantity, for an initial investment in a fixed-income offering (e.g., bond offering) through Fidelity. For most fixed-income securities offered through Fidelity, new issue and secondary offerings, the minimum increment is one bond. One bond is equal to $1,000. For municipal bonds, the minimum increment is five bonds which is equal to $5,000.

For Fixed Rate Capital Securities (FRCS) which trade in shares, the minimum increment is one share. One share is equal to $25. For Certificates of Deposit (CDs), the minimum increment is a dollar amount which is $1,000 or $5,000 for some callable CDs.

Minimum Investment/Minimum Investment Quantity/Minimum Quantity
The lowest amount required for an initial investment in a fixed income security (e.g., bond). For most fixed income securities offered through Fidelity, new issue and secondary offerings, the minimum investment is $1,000 which is equal to one bond. Other bonds vary both by product type and from bond to bond within product types.

For municipal bonds, the minimum investment is $5,000 with subsequent increments of $5,000. For Municipal Resets, the minimum quantity is 25 bonds for a $25,000 investment, with some having a 50 bond minimum.

Agency and GSE bonds mostly have a minimum order quantity of one bond, but minimum order sizes can vary to 5 or 10 bonds for a minimum investment amount of $5,000 or $10,000.

For Fixed Rate Capital Securities (FRCS) which trade in shares, the minimum investment is $25 which is equal to one share. For Certificates of Deposit (CDs), the minimum investment is $1,000 or $5,000 for some callable CDs.

Check the Offering table and the Bond Details screen for the price information specific to the security you are considering.

Minimum Offering Quantity
A menu selection when performing an Across Offerings search for secondary bonds. In most secondary bond offerings (except for Treasuries), the offering quantity is finite and specified by the offering dealer. This information is available in the Secondary Results pages column and as an input criterion in the Across Offering Search: Secondary. You may stipulate a desired minimum, with the default being 10 or more bonds for a given offering.

Minimum Price
For bond ladders, indicate the minimum price you would like to pay on any security in the ladder.

Minimum Rate
The minimum coupon rate that a stepped or variable rate security can adjust to. For bond ladders, you can indicate the minimum coupon you would like to receive on any security in the ladder.

Minimum Rating
Indicates the minimum (highest risk) credit rating acceptable for your ladder. The Bond Ladder tool searches a subset of Fidelity's offering inventory of bonds from your requested minimum rating to the highest rating (AAA), beginning with the minimum credit rating you indicated.

For example, if you indicate an A rating, the tool will search bonds with ratings between A and AAA. The Ladder tool will first search the inventory of A rated bonds before searching the more conservatively rated AA and AAA bonds.

Use the Sort By feature to identify the lowest yielding bonds within the universe of A rated bonds; i.e., the tool will not seek the lowest yield from the entire A to AAA inventory, which would result in bonds rated AAA bonds with yields most likely to be the lowest of all.

Minimum Yield
For bond ladders, you can indicate the minimum yield you would like to receive on any security in the ladder.

Miscellaneous Income
Income other than interest or dividends, subject to information reporting. Typical sources of this income include payments from a royalty trust.

Misc. Tax Withheld
This is the total amount of any taxes over and above federal, state, local, Medicare and social security taxes to which you may be subject. Your employer is required to report taxable income from the sale of stock options and remit the withholding amount to the appropriate regulatory agencies.

Mixed Lot
This refers to a trade order for a combination of a round lot and an odd lot number of units or shares for a security.

For example, a round lot for stocks is 100 shares and an odd lot is less than 100 shares. A mixed lot trade order could be for more than 100 shares, but in increments that don't equal 100 (e.g., 110, 150, etc.).

Model %
The percent gain or loss that the portfolio has achieved over the specified period of time. Refer to the as-of date to determine the specific time period. The Fidelity Portfolio Advisory ServiceSM and Fidelity Private Portfolio ServiceSM use model and target portfolios, respectively. The performance of customer's portfolios may be similar to that of these models, depending on the risk tolerance, fund composition, taxes or tax issues, and time horizon.

Moderate Long-Term Asset Allocation
Some domestic and foreign stocks with bond exposure. Indexes in this benchmark are the Dow Jones U.S. Total Stock Market Index (28%), MSCI EAFE Index (12%), Barclays Capital U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (45%), and Barclays Capital 3 Month U.S. T-Bill (15%).

Moderate with Income Long-Term Asset Allocation
A combination of domestic and foreign stocks with bond exposure. Indexes in this benchmark are the Dow Jones U.S. Total Stock Market Index (21%), MSCI EAFE Index (12%), Barclays Capital U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (50%), and Barclays Capital 3 Month U.S. T-Bill (20%).

Momentum
The Momentum indicator measures the amount that a security's price has changed over a given time span. The Momentum indicator displays the rate of change as a ratio.

The Momentum indicator can be used as a trend-following oscillator or as a leading indicator.

Used as a trend-following oscillator, technical analysts typically buy when the indicator bottoms and turns up and sell when the indicator peaks and turns down. If the Momentum indicator reaches extremely high values and then turns down, you should assume prices will probably go still higher.

The method of using the Momentum indicator as a leading indicator assumes that market tops are typically identified by a rapid price increase and market bottoms end with price declines. As the market peaks, the Momentum indicator will climb sharply and then fall off-diverging from the continued upward or sideways movement of the price. Similarly, at a market bottom, Momentum will drop sharply and then begin to climb well ahead of prices.

The Momentum indicator in BigCharts references the following default parameter: Number of Bars - 12 Bars.

Money Flow
The money flow indicator attempts to measure the amount of money buying a stock versus the amount of money selling a stock.

When a stock closes higher than its open, the money flow indicator assumes that all volume associated with that trading period results from buyers. It further assumes that when a stock closes lower than its open, all volume associated with that trading period results from sellers.

Although these assumptions are overly simplistic, money flow can be a useful indicator when analyzing the general buying and selling pressure on a stock.

Electronic Funds Transfer Purchase

For Fidelity IRAs, you can use the Electronic Funds Transfer service to transfer money from a

For information about or assistance with setting up or using Electronic Funds Transfer, call

Electronic Funds Transfer Redemption

For information about or assistance with setting up or using Electronic Funds Transfer, call

Electronic Funds Transfer Service

The Electronic Funds Transfer service for non-retirement accounts:

The Electronic Funds Transfer service for College Savings Plan accounts allows you to

The Electronic Funds Transfer service for Traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs:

For information about or assistance with setting up or using Electronic Funds Transfer, call

Money Market Fund
A fund that invests in high-quality securities that typically mature in less than 90 days, such as certificates of deposit (CDs), U.S. Treasury bills, and high-grade commercial paper.

Money Market's Full Name and Symbol
The ticker or exchange symbol used to identify the money market fund and the name of the fund.

Monthly %
The percent gain or loss that the portfolio has achieved over the previous month. Refer to the "as of" date to determine the specific time period.

Month-to-Date Margin Interest
The total amount of margin interest that has accrued against the amount you have borrowed on margin during the currently interest accrual cycle. Generally, the interest cycle runs from the 21st of each month to the 20th of the following month and is posted on the first business day following the 20th.

However, if the 20th falls on either a Friday or Saturday, margin interest is calculated and accrued through the day prior to the next business day. Additionally, margin interest for the following month does not begin to accrue until the next business day.

Moody's Investor Services
An independent organization that assigns credit ratings to debt instruments and securities to help investors assess credit risk.

Moody's Rating
A bond rating system used by Moody's to specify its assessment of the quality of bonds (e.g., Aaa for best quality bonds, Baa for a lower quality than Aaa, etc.).

Moody's® is a registered trademark of Moody's Investors Service, Inc.

Moody's ratings ("Ratings") are proprietary to Moody's or its affiliates and are protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws. Ratings are licensed to Licensee by Moody's. RATINGS MAY NOT BE COPIED OR OTHERWISE REPRODUCED, REPACKAGED, FURTHER TRANSMITTED, TRANSFERRED, DISSEMINATED, REDISTRIBUTED OR RESOLD, OR STORED FOR SUBSEQUENT USE FOR ANY SUCH PURPOSE, IN WHOLE OR IN PART, IN ANY FORM OR MANNER OR BY ANY MEANS WHATSOEVER, BY ANY PERSON WITHOUT MOODY'S PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT.

Morgan Stanley Capital International (MSCI) Developed Market Indices
MSCI Developed Market Indices are unmanaged and based on the share prices of approximately 1,700 companies listed on the stock exchanges in the twenty-two countries that make up the MSCI World Index. They are calculated without dividends, with net and gross dividends reinvested.

Morgan Stanley Capital International (MSCI) EAFE Index
The Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe, Australasia, Far East (MSCI EAFE®) Index is an unmanaged market capitalization-weighted index that is designed to represent the performance of developed stock markets outside the United States and Canada.

Morningstar Category
In an effort to distinguish funds by what they own, as well as by their prospectus objectives and styles, Morningstar developed the Morningstar Categories. While the prospectus objective identifies a fund's investment goals based on the wording in the fund prospectus, the Morningstar Category classifies funds based on their investment styles as measured by their underlying portfolio holdings (portfolio statistics and compositions over the past three years). If the fund is new and has no portfolio, Morningstar estimates where it will fall before assigning a more permanent category. When necessary, Morningstar may change a category assignment based on current information. Here's a list of the categories:

Morningstar Inc.
Morningstar, Inc. is an independent, third-party information provider. Morningstar provides holdings data including asset allocation, equity industry sector, and foreign vs. domestic classifications for publicly available mutual funds. This information is used in portfolio and account analysis.

Morningstar's Overall Rating

The overall Morningstar RatingTM for a fund is derived from a weighted average of the performance figures associated with its three-, five-, and 10-year (if applicable) Morningstar Rating metrics. For each fund with at least a three-year history, Morningstar calculates a Morningstar Rating (based on a Morningstar Risk-Adjusted Return measure that accounts for variation in a funds monthly performance (including the effects of sales charges, loads and redemption fees), placing more emphasis on downward variations and rewarding consistent performance. Morningstar distributes the stars accordingly:

Each share class is counted as a fraction of one fund within this scale and rated separately, which may cause slight variations in the distribution percentages.

Most Recent Price
The current market price of a stock. For fixed income securities, Most Recent Price is the valuation from the close of the most recent business day.

Most Recent Value
A security's Quantity multiplied by the price at which that security is currently trading. For certain fixed income products that pay principal, such as a mortgage-backed security, a Factor is used to determine the current face value of the position, as the face value of the position changes over time. To determine the Most Recent Value of a fixed income product with a factor, Price is multiplied by Quantity and Factor, and that number is divided by 100.

Most Recent Value

A security's Quantity multiplied by the Price at which that security is currently trading. For certain fixed income products that pay principal, such as a mortgage-backed security, a Factor is used to determine the current face value of the position, as the face value of the position changes over time. To determine the Most Recent Value of a fixed income product with a factor, Price is multiplied by Quantity and Factor, and that number is divided by 100.

Moving Averages
The average price of a security calculated periodically over some designated period of time.

In a price chart, choose from several popular moving averages using SMA or EMA. The input box immediately to the right of the drop-down box allows you to adjust the parameter(s) for each moving average. Moving averages will always plot in the chart's price window, i.e., upper plot.

Note that if you choose a multiple moving average, i.e., SMA (3-line), the system will automatically determine the lengths of SMA 2 and SMA 3 based on the number in the input box.

For example, if you type "9" in the input box and select "SMA (3-line)" from the drop-down box, the system will plot three moving averages: 9-bars, 18-bars, and 27-bars in length. SMA 2 is always twice the length of SMA 1 and SMA 3 is always three times the length of SMA 1.

After selecting your indicator(s), click Enter to update the chart.

MRD
The Minimum Required Distribution (MRD) is the minimum amount the government requires each investor to begin withdrawing from his or her retirement accounts each year by the age of 70 1/2. Generally, participants (other than 5% owners) in certain employer-sponsored retirement plans may be able to delay their MRDs until they retire. Roth IRAs are not subject to MRDs during the lifetime of the owner of the account.

MSCI All World ex US
The Morgan Stanley Capital International All Country World Ex-US Index (MSCI AC World Ex-US Index) is a recognized benchmark of non-U.S. stock markets. It is an unmanaged, market-value- weighted index composed of a sample of companies representative of the market structure of many countries and includes reinvestment of all dividends. The MSCI AC World Ex-US Index, when including or excluding securities, takes into account any limitations that an international investor would experience when investing directly in such securities. The index contains both developed and emerging market securities.

MSCI® EAFE® Index (Net MA Tax)
The Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe, Australasia, and Far East (MSCI EAFE) Index (net MA tax) is an unmanaged, market capitalization–weighted index of equity securities of companies domiciled in various countries. The index is designed to represent performance of developed stock markets outside the United States and Canada, and excludes certain market segments unavailable to U.S.-based investors. The index returns for periods after 1/1/1997 are adjusted for tax-withholding rates applicable to U.S.-based mutual funds organized as Massachusetts business trusts.

MSCI® Emerging Markets (EM) Index
A market capitalization–weighted index that is designed to measure the investable equity market performance for global investors of emerging markets.

MSCI World
An unmanaged, market-capitalization-weighted index of equity securities of companies domiciled in various countries that is designed to represent the performance of developed stock markets throughout the world.

Multi-contingent
A multi-contingent order is an order that executes when two specified criteria are met, such as the achievement of a stock price and a particular index level. The two criteria are linked by one of three variables: "And at the same time", "Or", "Then". You have the flexibility to decide whether you want both criteria to be met at the same time (And at the same time), or either one to be met out of the two chosen (Or), or both criteria to be met in sequential order (Then). The available Trigger Values are the same as a regular contingent order and a triggered multi-contingent order follows the same process flow as a triggered contingent order.

Multi-leg Option
Multi-leg options are two or more option transactions, or "legs," bought and/or sold simultaneously in order to achieve a certain investment goal. Typically, multi-leg options are traded according to a particular multi-leg option trading strategy.

Multiple Margin Balances
The combined margin balance value of several eligible brokerage accounts. These summary balances optimize your margin capabilities by summing the asset information for multiple portfolios in determining one SMA to derive margin data for your overall relationship.

Municipal Bond
Securities issued by local governmental subdivisions such as cities, towns, villages, counties or special districts, as well as securities issued by states and political subdivisions or agencies of states. A prime feature of these securities is that interest on them is generally exempt from federal income taxes and, in some cases, state and local taxes too.

Municipal Bond New Issues
Debt obligations issued by states, cities, counties and other public entities that you buy directly from the state, city, etc. through Fidelity. These securities are generally issued to raise funds for public projects such as the construction of schools, hospitals, highways, sewers, and universities.

Generally, municipal bond coupon interest is exempt from federal taxation and may also be free from state and local taxes. However, the coupon interest may be subject to alternative minimum tax and tax exemptions may vary. The tax information contained herein is general in nature, is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or tax advice. Fidelity does not provide legal or tax advice. Always consult an attorney or tax professional regarding your specific legal or tax situation.

Typically, municipal bonds can be purchased in increments of five bonds which is equal to $5,000 and with $5,000 increments thereafter.

Municipal General Obligation Bond

A type of municipal bond backed by the full faith, credit, and taxing power of the issuer, specifically its ability to collect taxes. Only entities that have the right to levy and collect taxes can issue general obligation bonds. Certain governmental entities are subject to legal limits on the amount of taxes that they can impose, and their issues are called limited-tax general obligation bonds. Unlimited-tax bonds are issued by government entities that are not subject to those limits.

Municipal Reset

A type of municipal bond whose interest rates are periodically re-set through auctions held every 7, 14, 28 and 35 days. Some municipal reset bonds re-set daily, pay out interest monthly, and trade with accrued interest. Even though the rates are regularly re-set, the underlying municipal bond may be issued with a maturity lasting anywhere from 5 to 30 years.

Municipal resets are sold through a Dutch Auction, which determines the rate that will prevail on each auction date. As a result of the auction, the rate will change for existing holders as well. This rate prevails until the next reset date.

Municipal resets may be purchased only on the day of the auction. Orders must be placed between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. ET, or for bonds that reset daily, between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. ET. The minimum required investment varies by issue, but is typically $25,000. Bonds are sold at par or 100, which equates to $1,000 per bond.

If you want to sell a municipal reset, you should also place your order on the day of the re-set in order to receive a price of 100 and the return of principal.

Municipal Revenue Bond

A bond that is payable from a specific source of revenue and to which the full faith and credit of an issuer with taxing power is not pledged; payable from identified sources of revenue and do not permit the bondholders to compel taxation or legislative appropriation of funds not pledged for payment of debt service. Pledged revenues may be derived from operation of the financed project, grants and excise or other specified non-ad-valorem taxes. Generally, no voter approval is required prior to issuance of such obligations.

Municipal Securities
A type of debt security issued by local governmental subdivisions such as cities, towns, counties, or special districts, as well as securities issued by states and political subdivisions or agencies of states. A prime feature of these securities is that coupon interest on them is generally exempt from federal income taxes and, in some cases, state and local taxes as well. Municipal bonds come in two basic types: general obligation bonds, which are backed by the full faith and credit of the issuer, and revenue bonds, which are backed by revenue generated by a particular project.

Mutual Fund
An investment that pools shareholders money and invests it toward a specified goal. The group's money is invested by a professional investment manager.

On the Mutual Fund IRA Electronic Funds Transfer Confirmation screen, this is the mutual fund in which you will buy shares with your annual IRA contribution.

Mutual Fund Account Number
The unique identifier Fidelity assigned to each position at the fund level in your Mutual Fund account.

Each fund position for which you hold shares in your mutual fund account has a separate mutual fund account number.

For a mutual fund exchange to a new fund, New displays instead of the mutual fund account number on the exchange order confirmation.

Mutual Fund Symbol
This is a drop-down list which is shown twice on the mutual fund exchange order entry screen when you are exchanging funds in a mutual fund account.

In one instance of the drop-down list, you select the mutual fund to sell and, in the other, you select or enter the mutual fund for which you want to buy additional shares.

mySmart Cash Manager®
A feature available on the Fidelity® Cash Management Account that automates transfers between Fidelity® Cash Management Account and eligible bank and brokerage accounts, and reminds you to invest extra cash for higher returns.

mySmart Cash Manager® Alerts
When you set up mySmart Cash Manager®, you can elect to receive alerts whenever a money movement is triggered by your Minimum Target Balance or Self-Funded Overdraft Protection. These alerts are sent after the transaction is initiated.

You will automatically receive an alert if your account balance reaches the Maximum Target Balance you set for your account. While money is not moved to your investment accounts automatically, this alert gives you the opportunity to invest your extra cash for the long run.

You can change your alerts by visiting the mySmart Cash Manager Preferences page.

mySmart Cash Manager® Self Funded Overdraft Protection
As part of mySmart Cash Manager®, Self Funded Overdraft Protection helps fund Fidelity® Cash Management Account debit requests if the debit requests (i.e., from a debit card, direct debit, Fidelity BillPay®, check disbursement, wire, or other cash transactions) exceed the Fidelity® Cash Management Account's available cash balance.