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B

Balance
This can be one of the following:

Balanced Long-Term Asset Allocation
A steady combination of domestic and some foreign stocks, offset by bonds and T-Bills. Indexes in this benchmark are the Dow Jones U.S. Total Stock Market Index (35%), MSCI EAFE (15%), Barclays Capital U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (40%), and 3-Month T-Bill (10%).

Balances
This amount is the sum of all your contributions and employer matching contributions, if any, for the period.

Bank Account Number
The bank account to which mutual fund redemptions are sent, or the bank account for Electronic Funds Transfers.

Bank Business Day
This refers to a day, Monday through Friday excluding holidays when U.S. banks are open.

Bank Name
The name of a bank to or from which you want to transfer money using Fidelity Electronic Funds Transfer.

Bank Qualified
Bonds that banks and trust departments can hold in their portfolios. These bonds are usually rated investment grade or higher. The issuer is generally limited to no more than 10 million dollars per year of outstanding indebtedness.

Bank Routing Number
The unique transit routing number that identifies a specific bank or institution. This is also sometimes referred to as the ABA number.

The transit routing number is used to wire redemptions to a bank account.

You specify a bank routing number when adding the Bank Wire feature or Electronic Funds Transfer service to an account.

Bank State
The state in which the issuing bank of a Certificate of Deposit is registered.

Bank Wire Indicator
Indicates if an account has the Bank Wire feature. This feature allows fund redemptions to be wired to a bank account you specify.

Barclays Capital Aggregate Bond Index
The Barclays Capital Aggregate Bond Index is a market capitalization-weighted index, meaning the securities in the index are weighted according to the market size of each bond type. Most U.S. traded investment grade bonds are represented. Municipal bonds and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are excluded, due to tax treatment issues. The index includes US Treasury Securities (non TIPS), Government agency bonds, Mortgage backed bonds, Corporate bonds, and a small amount of foreign bonds traded in U.S.

Barclays Capital U.S. Agency Bond Index
The Barclay Capital U.S. Agency Bond Index measures the performance of the agency sector of the U.S. government bond market and is compromised of investment-grade native-currency U.S. Dollar-denominated debentures issued by government and government-related agencies, including the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA" or "Fanni-Mae"). The index includes both callable and non-callable agency securities that are publicly-issued by U.S. Government agencies, quasi-federal corporations, and corporate and foreign debt guaranteed by the U.S. government.

Barclays Capital U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
The Lehman Brothers U.S. Aggregate Index is an unmanaged, market-value-weighted index of taxable investment-grade fixed-rate debt issues, including government, corporate, asset-backed, and mortgage backed securities, with maturities of one year or more.

Barclays Capital U.S. Government Bond Index
A market value weighted index of U.S. Government and government agency securities (other than mortgage securities) with maturities of one year or more.

Barclays Capital U.S. Insured Municipal Bond Index
Barclays Capital U.S. Insured Municipal Bond Index is an unmanaged, market-value-weighted index of investment-grade municipal bonds with maturities of one year or more.

Barclays Capital U.S. Intermediate Government/Corporate Bond Index
The Barclays Capital U.S. Intermediate Government/Corporate Bond Index is a market value weighted performance benchmark for government and corporate fixed-rate debt issues with maturities between one and 10 years.

Barclays Capital U.S. Universal
The Barclays Capital U.S. Universal Index represents the union of the U.S. Aggregate Index, U.S. Corporate High-Yield, Investment Grade 144A Index, Eurodollar Index, U.S. Emerging Markets Index, and the non-ERISA eligible portion of the CMBS Index. The index covers USD- denominated, taxable bonds that are rated either investment-grade or below investment-grade.

Base Coupon
This is the date on which the next or last coupon interest payment for a fixed-income security (e.g., a bond) was paid or is scheduled to be paid, depending on which date is closest to the current calendar date. For example, if it is 10/1/2001, the coupon payment is quarterly, the last payment was on 9/20/2001 and the next payment would be on 12/20/2001, the 9/20/2001 date would display.

Referencing this date and the payment frequency information together can help you determine the date for the next coupon interest payment.

Based On
The specified price a trailing stop order can trail the market which includes Last Trade, Bid and Ask. This field is only available for trailing stop orders.

Basis Point
One one-hundredth (1/100 or 0.01) of one percent. Used to express the yield.

Basis Previously Provided
The indicator of whether or not you provided the cost basis and holding period date of these shares.

Possible Values:

Note: You may update cost basis in either case.

Basket Name
The name of your basket. Each basket must have a unique name.

Basket Position Cost
The position level cost for each holding in a basket, based on the acquisition cost or average cost if shares have been added or removed from a basket position.

Basket Return
For basket trading, the Total Current Market Value divided by the Total Basket Cost.

Beginning FMV
The fair market value of a company's stock at the close of business on the first day of the offering period.

Benchmark
An unmanaged group of securities whose overall performance is used as a standard against which relative investment performance is measured.

Benchmark %
The percentage of the portfolio represented by a particular index, like the Wilshire 5000.

Benchmark Formula
A formula to determine a performance standard against which a bond or other security can be measured.

In the case of variable or step-rate securities, the addition or subtraction of a certain coupon rate differential over a benchmark.

Benchmark Reference
A group of securities or an index whose overall performance is generally agreed to be used as a standard against which relative investment performance is measured, or, in the case of variable or stepped rate securities, against which an interest rate differential or "spread" will be added or subtracted.

Beneficiary
The person or other party designated to receive the proceeds from a life insurance policy, trust, estate, College Savings Plan, retirement account, etc.

Best Ask
The price that someone who owns a security offers as a price at which they will sell.

Best Bid
The price a prospective buyer is willing to pay for a share of a security at a particular time.

Best Effort
Occurs when the issuing bank has not required the underwriter (Fidelity Capital Marketís underwriting desk) to commit to raising any specific amount. For other underwriting arrangements, see Firm Commitment.

Best n-Year Return
On the Historical Analysis screen, this is the best average annual return that is returned from the market for the asset-allocation mix shown over a 35-year period. Returns for the best 1-year and then returns in 5-year increments up to 35 years are shown.

The analysis uses your portfolio or one or more selected accounts to calculate asset-allocation mix percentages. Then, the historical performance information is calculated for that asset allocation using general market indexes.

Best n Years
On the Historical Analysis screen, this is the number of years over which account values are graphed.

If a security you hold has not existed for 35 years, then best values over the life of the security are provided.

Beta
Beta is a coefficient which measures the volatility of a stock's returns relative to a given market index. In the case of a Company Profile displayed on fidelity.com, the index used is the S&P 500. It is based on a 60-month historical regression of the return on the stock onto the market return.

A negative beta indicates the stock tends to move in the opposite direction from the general market. That is, the stock price declines when the overall market is rising, or rises when the overall market is declining. Negative Beta stocks are rare. Beta values are not calculated if less than 24 months of pricing is available.

Bid [tick]
Refer to Bid Price.

For Extended Hours session (Premarket or After Hour session) quotes, this is the best price* at which someone is willing to buy shares of the stock through the ECN in which Fidelity participates.

* Extended Hours quotes obtained from Fidelity.com will only reflect the prices available in the ECN, linked ECNs and Nasdaq's SelectNet, when available.

For Premarket and After Hours session trade orders, the bid price source is the ECN and Extended Hours Session displays as the source on trade order verification screens.

For Fidelity variable annuity investment option quotes, this information is not applicable and N/A displays in the Bid Exchange field.

Bid

A proposal to purchase securities at a specified price. Bids are infrequently available for municipal bonds and certificates of deposit (CDs) as compared to more liquid fixed income securities, such as U.S. Treasuries and corporate bonds.

Bid Orders
The list of the top (highest price) ten offers to buy a security during a Premarket or After Hours session.

The list displays only on the Full Book quote screen.

For each order in the Bid Orders list, the following information is displayed from left to right:

Bid Price [tick]
The price a buyer is willing to pay for a security.

Nasdaq® requires all real-time data distributors to display a Bid Tick indicator on quotation displays for securities traded on the Nasdaq Global MarketSM. The indicator displays the upward [+] or downward [-] movement from the previous bid price. This indicator only displays for securities traded on the Nasdaq Global Market.

For Extended Hours session (Premarket and After Hour session) quotes, this is the best price* at which someone is willing to buy shares of the stock through the Electronic Communications Network (ECN) in which Fidelity participates.

* Extended Hours quotes obtained from Fidelity.com will only reflect the prices available in the ECN, linked ECNs and Nasdaq's SelectNet®, when available.

For Premarket and After Hours session trade orders, the bid price source is the ECN and Extended Hours session displays as the source on trade order verification screens.

For Fidelity variable annuity investment option quotes, this information is not applicable and N/A displays in the Bid Price field.

Bid Quantity
The total quantity of a specific fixed income security that investors are currently willing to purchase at the highest bid price.

Bid Size
The number of round lots currently available at the bid price. For example, if this field displays 15, that represents 15 round lots or 1500 shares.

For Extended Hours session (Premarket or After Hours session) quotes, this is the total number of shares that investors are willing to buy at the bid price* through the ECN in which Fidelity participates, linked ECNs and Nasdaq's SelectNet, when available. For example, a bid size of 500 could be the total of 100 and 400 shares that two different prospective buyers are willing to buy at the quoted bid price.

* This is the bid size for the highest bid price in the ECN, linked ECNs and Nasdaq's SelectNet, when available. Extended Hours quotes obtained from Fidelity.com will only reflect the prices available in the ECN.

For Fidelity variable annuity investment option quotes, this information is not applicable and N/A displays in the Bid Size field.

Bid Yield
The highest annual rate of return on an investment (e.g., a bond) at which a buyer is willing to buy a security.

BigCharts
BigCharts, Inc. provides some security price charts for informational purposes only. BigCharts, Inc. is an independent, third-party company and is not affiliated with Fidelity Investments or any of its affiliates.

Bill Payment
Refer to Fidelity BillPaySM service.

Blackout Period
These are certain times of the year when privileges to exercise your stock options may be restricted. Refer to your stock option plan rules for more information.

For example, blackout periods often coincide with a company's fiscal year end, dividend schedules, and calendar year end.

Blank Rung
A blank rung is a placeholder rung in your bond ladder. It's left blank because there are no bond offerings that meet your selection criteria and can fill the rung. You can:

Blend
This is an investment type referring to stocks with a valuation that is close to that of the S & P 500.

Portfolio and account analysis shows information about your holdings' investment types in the Domestic Equity Style Profile. For more information about the Domestic Equity Style Profile, select Learn More About Analysis at the top of the analysis screens.

In the Domestic Equity Style Profile section on the Holdings Detail screen, this is the value of your domestic holdings that are classified as equities and underlying securities of pooled investments such as mutual funds which are small cap blend, mid cap blend, or large cap blend. All values are as of the date and time shown in the Control Panel.

Blended Benchmark
A combination of market indexes in varying percentages used to evaluate the performance of an investment account.

Block Trades
The number of block trades that have occurred for a security during the current trading day as of the date and time displayed.

Block Volume
The percentage of all trades for a security that have been placed during the current trading day as of the date and time displayed.

Blue-Chip Stocks
Stocks of well-established companies that have had a history of earnings and dividend payments, as well as a reputation for sound management and quality of products and services. While not all large cap stocks are blue chip stocks, there is usually a large cap bias to blue chip stocks.

Blue Sky Laws
The registration of new issue securities with the state agency that reviews selling documents for accuracy and completeness. When seen as an attribute ("SKY") in a CD Results table or Details page, the phrase is used to point out those states that have Blue Sky Laws that prohibit the marketing and sale of that security to customers residing in that state.

Bollinger Bands
Bollinger Bands are a type of envelope (or trading band) plotted at standard deviation levels above and below a moving average.

Because standard deviation measures volatility, the bands widen during volatile markets and contract during calmer periods.

Mr. Bollinger notes the following characteristics of Bollinger Bands:

Bond
An interest bearing security for which the issuer agrees to pay the bondholder a specified sum of money, usually at specific intervals. That issuer can be the federal government (as in the case of Treasury bonds) or a local government (municipal bonds), government sponsored enterprises (like Fannie Mae), companies (corporate bonds) or even foreign governments or international corporations. The investor, or bond buyer, generally receives regular interest payments on the loan until the bond matures or is "called," at which point the issuer repays you the principal. Zero-coupon bonds pay both the imputed interest and the principal at maturity.

Bond/CD Redemption Alerts
Fidelity Bond/CD Redemption Alerts is a service designed to provide Fidelity customers with information about key changes to the status of their bonds via either paper or e-mail. Customers can enroll in the Alerts service by going to the Research tab and selecting Alerts.

Bond/CD Redemption Alerts consist of the following events:

Bond Concession Schedule

For secondary market fixed income security transactions, concession is the per-bond trading charge levied in addition to the purchase or selling price quoted. A concession is the per-bond markup or markdown on a fixed income trade, as opposed to an agent commission. Concessions vary by product type. Bonds are made available from our affiliate, National Financial Services (NFS), and from various external dealers for whom Fidelity Brokerage Services acts as riskless principal. The offering broker, which may be our affiliate NFS, may realize a trading profit or loss on the transaction. For a complete breakdown of Fidelity's Fixed Income concession schedule, go to Investment Products > Brokerage, click Learn About Fidelity Brokerage, and under Fidelity Account Details, click Brokerage Commission and Fee Schedule.

Bond CUSIP
The security identifier number used throughout the financial community to identify a bond.

Bond Funds
Bond funds are professionally managed portfolios that invest in individual fixed income securities. Funds are guided by a stated objective, generally focusing on a particular sector, such as corporate or Treasury bonds; a broad category, such as investment grade or high yield securities; or a specific time horizon, such as short-, intermediate-, or long-term bonds.

Bonds/Shares
On the Open Indications of Interest screen, this is the number of bonds or shares that you entered as part of an indication of interest in a new issue fixed-income offering (e.g., bond offering). For Fixed Rate Capital Securities, you enter the number of shares instead of bonds.

Bond Type
The type of bond as delineated across the primary product sub-categories of corporates, municipals, Agencies/GSEs, Treasuries, or Certificates of Deposit. In the bond ladder tool, bond type indicates whether the ladder will invest in only municipal or taxable bonds. Generally, tax-free municipal securities are considered inappropriate holdings for tax-advantaged accounts such as an IRAs and other retirement accounts. Please consult your tax advisor for advice about your specific situation.

Book Value Per Share, MRQ ($ per share)
In a Company Profile, this is defined as the common shareholder's equity divided by the shares outstanding at the end of the most recent fiscal quarter.

MRQ is the most recent quarter.

Borrowing on Margin
Borrowing using loan value generated from securities held in margin. Borrowing on margin increases the margin debit balance in the account.

Break Even
The underlying stock price at which an options strategy (or combined stock and option strategy) has a zero loss and zero gain.

Broadly Diversified International Equity Funds
Broadly diversified international equity funds generally fall into two categories:international funds, which do not invest in U.S. securities, and global funds, which invest anywhere in the world, including the U.S. Although they are both considered more aggressive than most domestic equity funds, broadly diversified funds are often considered to be a "less aggressive" type of international fund because of their typical emphasis on diversification within established markets. With these funds, risk is spread out across an expansive geographic area rather than concentrated in a single region or country. These funds are used by many investors to form the foundation of the international component of their portfolio.

Broad Market Comparison
On the Graphical View screen, this is the distribution of your domestic holdings that are classified as equities by industry sector (e.g., durables, staples, retail, health, etc.) relative to equities tracked on the Wilshire 5000 Equity Index.

You can also see if the percentage of your securities in an industry sector is higher (overweight) or lower (underweight) compared to the equities tracked on the Wilshire 5000 Equity Index.

The Wilshire 5000 Equity Index is used, because it includes over 7,000 securities and measures the performance of the publicly traded stocks of U.S.-headquartered companies on which pricing data is available.

BrokerageFlex
This is a section of the Portfolio screen in which all of your institutional self-directed brokerage accounts in your employer's qualified retirement plan are displayed. An account is considered institutional if it is introduced to Fidelity through a financial intermediary such as a Registered Investment Advisor or Third Party Administrator.

BrokerageLink
This is a Fidelity NetBenefits® account investment option that is available through some employers' plans.

The availability of Fidelity NetBenefits and the options and services available to you depend on the specific features of your employer's plan.

If your NetBenefits account has the BrokerageLink investment option and you use it, a linked brokerage account maintained with Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC is funded with money from your NetBenefits account. From this linked brokerage account, you can buy a variety of securities (e.g., stocks, bonds, mutual funds) depending on the type of plan and the plan provisions.

The BrokerageLink value that is displayed on the NetBenefits Account Balances screen is the market value of the linked brokerage account as of the date displayed.

Note:On the Portfolio screen, a BrokerageLink account is listed separately from a NetBenefits account with which it is linked and is displayed as a non-prototype (NONP) brokerage account.

Bronze Pricing
Fidelity's Bronze Level pricing is available to all customers. There is no minimum asset level or number of trades.

Butterfly
A butterfly spread is a multi-leg option strategy made up of all calls or all puts with three different strike prices. It is ratio spread with a 1:2:1 ratio. There are two types of butterflies long and short. Long Butterfly spreads are established by purchasing a call/put at low strike price, selling 2 call/put at middle strike price, and then buying a call/put at highest strike price. Long butterflies are generally used by people who feel the underlying will trade in a narrow range. This strategy has limited up and downside. Short Butterfly spreads are established by selling a call/put at low strike price, buying 2 call/put at middle strike price, and then selling a call/put at highest strike price. Short butterflies are generally used by people who feel the underlying will move significantly. This strategy has limited up and downside.

Buy
Refers to buying securities. Also refers to an analyst's recommendation to buy a security.

Buy Side
In a multi-leg options transaction (or a combined stock and option strategy), this is the stock or option transaction that constitutes your purchase, or buy. For example, in a covered call, where you buy a stock and sell a covering option, the stock purchase would be the buy side.

Buy to Close
Closing of a short position in an option transaction.

Buy to Cover
Buying shares of a stock to offset a short position, a position for shares of a stock you sold but did not own.

Buy to Open
Opening of a long position in an option transaction.

Buy Write
A buy-write trade order is the simultaneous purchase of stock and the sale of covered call options for the same underlying security. For example (where XYZ is a fictitious trading symbol), selling 1 XYZ FEB 65 call options and buying 100 shares of XYZ. To place a buy-write order, you must have an Option Agreement on file with Fidelity and be approved for option trading level 1 or higher. Buy writes require a minimum of 1 contracts/100 shares.

Buying Power
The maximum dollar amount available, including both cash and margin, to purchase marginable securities without adding money to your account. The balance includes open order commitments, intraday trade executions, and money movement into and out of the account.

Buying Power Used
The dollar amount of Buying Power used on trades that have executed today and the amount  committed to orders that have  yet to be executed. You can reduce this value—in other words, increase your Buying Power—by cancelling or replacing open Buy or short sale orders or by transferring money into the account.

By
A drop-down list on the Symbol Lookup screen that displays a list of criteria from which you can choose to lookup a symbol.

You can choose from: